MISCELLANEOUS BRITAIN

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yorkshire

yorkshire

yorkshire

the fens

the fens

the fens

the fens

the fens

the fens

the fens

the fens

the fens

covehithe

covehithe

covehithe

covehithe

covehithe

dungeness

dungeness

dungeness

dungeness

dungeness

calshot

calshot

The variety of images in this section are drawn from many smaller projects which have been made over shorter periods of maybe only two to three visits.

The scarred limestone pavement is at Malham in North Yorkshire and it amazing to think that this area was largely forested before the introduction of sheep farming for the medieval wool trade.

The Fens of East Anglia are an extraordinarily open and exposed area. The large drains keep the land workable as so much of it was reclaimed from marshland. While in winter it can be very cold, it always dramatic with its vast open skies. Along the coast of East Anglia there is continuous erosion with land constantly lost to the North Sea. At Covehithe the sea is eating away at a sand cliff and the oak trees are collapsing onto the beach where they are stripped to silver skeletons by the sea.

While at Dungeness, on the Kent coast, there is a vast nuclear power station dominating the landscape, there is also this curious scene of huts, fishing boats, and junk along a raised shingle beach. Calshot near Southampton was once famous for its 'flying boats' but, a little like Covehithe, it suffers from erosion as it forms a small headland sticking out at the side of the Solent.

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